Gallery

Wireframes

Advertisements

MOCWOW

I used MoSCoW techniques to prioritise the development my project. I propose to get all the MUST completed first, then work through the SHOULD and COULD if time is permitted…

MUST

  • Provide training plans in a visual, interesting way (not basic table)
  • Offer marathon training plans of different difficulties
  • Connect to Strava API in order to progress through plans
  • Be responsive

SHOULD

  • Allow users to register/login and store their training guide progression
  • Be personal
  • Provide running tips (throughout or on completion)
  • Incorporate sharing features

COULD

  • Total up users training statistics on completion
  • Use subtle animations throughout website
  • Offer training plans for other common race distances

WON’T

  • Track users running activities

Evaluation

Overall, I feel I successfully created a piece of interactive information design for the shared public space, which intends to elucidate/explain an idea or concept. I am happy with my final piece and felt that it worked well with the target audience (see users interacting with piece). I have learnt a lot by doing this project, both the programming side as well as following an iterative design process. The concept that my piece applies to is Surrealism, this concept interests me and looking at various surreal art work and photography really inspired me for my piece. I have used surrealist techniques in my piece such as the juxtaposition of falling objects, repetition of shapes, as well as ideas relating to the blurring boundaries between the real and imaginary. Throughout my blog, I have linked the theory modules that I have studied to my practice (media and history, and consumer culture) as I feel that this is important; it has developed my understandings and allowed me to use more theoretical analysis. I used an iterative design process to produce my piece, which allowed me to constantly gain feedback, and make improvements that have helped to make my end piece more successful. The iterative design processes that I followed were:

– Requirements Gathering
– Analysis
– Design
– User Testing

To view blog posts related to each iteration, then click on the individual categories. Throughout my blog you can clearly see the development of my piece: from learning the basics of programming, to watching tutorials, analysing existing examples, experimenting with various ideas, improving the piece, and finally to users interacting with my final piece.

Pseudo-code

Pseudo-code is a informal notation resembling a simplified programming language. Pseudo-code can be applied to all programming languages and is a helpful step in order to process various ideas into code. It is a simply written, step by step structure, to help write the actual programming language. Using pseudo-code can be beneficial as it allows us to plan work more thoroughly rather than jumping straight into programming. However, it is a extra step that sometimes isn’t always necessary for advanced programers. Here is a simple example of both a flowchart and pseudo-code in order to make a cup of tea:

cup-of-tea1

The steps are simple for anyone to understand and from this can be transferred into the required programming language. For my project, I am using Java within Processing and as I am not advanced in this language I could use pseudo-code in order to structure my idea and help me to transform it into code. I feel by doing this it would be beneficial, as it will help me to fully plan my idea and enable me to clearly see whether it is realistic to achieve by the deadline. By carrying out efficient planning, it can then result in a more efficient development process and means that fewer problems arise during coding. Next, I will go on to further plan out my idea and write out a basic pseudo-code for it.

Active Audiences

Contemporary audiences are more active consumers of media texts. For my interactive infographic, it requires my target audience to be active and interact with my piece. The rise of interactivity within contemporary media texts highlights the changing consumption habits of audiences, from passivity to activity. Cover (2006 cited by Macek 2013) describes interactivity as

‘a culturally motivated and historically variable desire to participate in textuality.’

Audiences involvement with texts is increasing; not only by interacting more with the producers’ final media text/piece, but also with the production of texts. This relates to an iterative design process as it is important to engage with the audience at all stages within the process in order to gain useful advice and feedback. For my piece, audiences will hopefully engage with the final piece, but it is essential that throughout I involve the audience with the production and development of my piece. Jenkins (2006, p.60) suggests that:

‘Consumption becomes production; reading becomes writing; spectator culture becomes participatory culture.’

I feel that Jenkins ideas can apply to my target audience as well as to contemporary culture. I’m aware that individuals may participate with my final piece in various ways, some may prefer to spectate whereas others will be more willing to participate. Jenkins idea of ‘consumption becomes production’ relates to Lister et al (2003, p.10), as they believe that:

‘we have seen a shift from ‘audiences’ to ‘users’, and from ‘consumers’ to ‘producers’

This highlights the increasing power that contemporary audiences now have with media texts, and relates to theory I studied in first year regarding fandom, user-generated content and authorship. This shift also relates to a theory unit I have recently studied, Media and History. It highlight the importance of exploring history, as in this case it helps our understandings of contemporary theory debates regarding audiences.

From this, I feel it is extremely important to continuously engage with my target audience throughout the development of my interactive piece. For my piece to be successful, it needs to appeal to its audience and as Gray (2010, p.166) says

‘a text only becomes a text, only gains social meaning and relevance, at the point that it comes alive with its audience.’

I aim to do this by regularly including the audience within the production of the piece in order to gain ideas and useful feedback. As well as making the final piece easy for all individuals to actively interact with.

References:

Gray, J, 2010. Show Sold Separately: Promos, Spoilers, and Other Media Paratexts. New York and London: New York University Press.

Jenkins, H, 2006. Fans, Bloggers and Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture. London: New York University Press.

Lister, M, Dovey, J, Giddings, S, Grant, I, and Kelly, K, 2003. New Media: A Critical Introduction [online]. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge.

Macek, J, 2013. More than a desire for text: Online participation and the social curation of content. In: Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies [online], 19(3), 295-302.